Biennale of Chianciano - Review

Chianciano Art Museum during the Chianciano Biennale

 

The Biennale of Chianciano 2011 was a surprisngly good show. These days one can never be sure what to expect when going to see an exhibition of centemporary art but in 2011, the Chianciano Art Museum was able to present a high standard of international art and the curatorial study was no less professional than what you would expect to find in London or New York.

The artists were selected from all four corners of the world, many of whom having exhibited in important and recognised museums and institutions such as the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Georgetown, and the National Museum, Beijing. However, as a rule, the museum states that it does not consider previous achievements and the choice is "purely based on the skill and talent" of the individual artist and this year has been a pleasant and refreshing surprise.

Against all odds and expectations, the selection committee 2011 decided to show exceptional works of a four year old Australian called Aelita Andre, a six year old Romanian called Celine Ali and a 14 year old Greek called Markella Lousidis. The quality of their work earned them a place at the 2011 Chianciano Biennale, in a context where established artists labor to peel away prejudice and pretense, these young artists’ vulnerability appears effortless and even though they were chosen solely on the basis of their talent and innovative work, this does not mean that they had not previously caused a stir on their local as well as the international art scene.

Art critics across three continents compare four year old Aelita Andre to Pablo Picasso for her genius and to Jackson Pollock for her process and style. Anyone standing in front of her paintings will find it impossible to consider the fact that she still has not lost her baby teeth. She caused a buzz in the art world at 22 months old in Australia and has since had an exhibition as far as Manhattan, New York. When asked about the aspiring talent on Al Jazeera news Peter Gagliardi of the Gagliardi Gallery in London described her harmony of color as “genius” without hesitation. From her computer in Greece, Markella Lousidis writes candidly, “ Monsters still scare me.” Her bravery in communicating fear translates to her art, exemplified in her bold use of color in “Aranxa,” a palette no doubt inspired from her native Athens. Celine Ali attends the National College of Arts “ Queen Maria” and has several exhibitions under her belt including group and personal exhibitions in Constanta, Romania.

In 2009, the Chianciano Biennale included the works of over 150 artists and drew a crowd of more than 10,000 collectors, art enthusiasts and gallery representatives. Participants from approximately 60 nations gathered together to experience what Robert Scott of the Anglo-Italian Academy of Art has called “ the second most important curated Biennale after Venice.”

Roberto Gagliardi, museum director and lead curator for the Chianciano Biennale, has said that this year the Biennale will revive contemporary art in Italy. The week-long line-up of events is sure to do just that with evening activities including wine tasting, films, dancing, and live music.

The 160 artists that exhibited in this edition of the Chianciano Biennale were selected from a pool of thousands of very talented applicants. A committee of experienced experts and curators have selected artists and the competitive selection process contributes to the event’ s budding prestige, gaining it attention from international press. This year, the Chianciano Art Museum featured the work of some of the world’ s youngest and most promising new talent, many under the age of 14, offering a unique window into their fresh perspective. Fortunately for visitors at this year’s Chianciano Biennale, Celine Ali age 14, Markella age 6, and Aelita Andre age 4, have not allowed their ages to prevent them from showing off their artistic talents in this international event. Their skill, and quality of work earned them a place at this years exhibition. In a field where established artists labor to peel away prejudice and pretense, these young artists’ vulnerability appears effortless.

From her computer in Greece, Markella writes candidly, “ Monsters still scare me.” Her braveryin communicating fear translates to her art, exemplified in her bold use of color in “ Aranxa,” a palette no doubt inspired from her native Athens.

Art critics compare four year old Aelita Andre to Pablo Picasso for her genius and to Jackson Pollock for her process and style. Anyone standing in front of her paintings will find it impossible to consider the fact that she still has not lost her baby teeth. She caused a buzz in the art world at 22 months old when Brunswick Street Gallery included her work in a group exhibition in London. Since then Manhattan’s Agora Gallery has featured her collection in a personal exhibition, her paintings sell for more than $24,000 each. When asked about the aspiring talent on Al Jazeera news Peter Gagliardi of the Gagliardi Gallery in London described her harmony of color as “ genius” without hesitation.

Andre is not the only artist in attendance to the Chianciano Biennale with a resume beyond her years. Celine Ali attends the National College of Arts “ Queen Maria” and has several exhibitions under her belt including group and personal exhibitions in Constanta, Romania.

Chianciano is famous for its rejuvenating thermal springs, known for centuries as a place of healing. The Chianciano Biennale is a testament to the revival not only for contemporary art in Italy, but also for the mind and body of all who attended.

Biennale Chianciano

Chianciano Art Museum

 

 

 

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